Not the 365 – Movie round up

We’ve gone a bit retro this week, digging back into our DVD’s and Blurays, so there’s a chance these will be familiar to you dear reader. First up is Phil’s choice….

Robocop 1987

Directed by the much revered Paul Verhoeven, it’s set in a dystopian future Detroit, on the brink of financial and social collapse. Due to these circumstances and the resulting rise in crime, the police force has been handed over to a private mega-corporation, Omni Consumer Products (OCP). The movie starts out in the OCP boardroom, where the vice-president Dick Jones (Ronny Cox) is demonstrating a large robot, the ED-209 a law enforcement droid, which is supposed to replace policemen. It malfunctions and exterminates a board member quite spectacularly. This allows an ambitious junior executive, Bob Morton (Miguel Ferrer) to push his own idea of Robocop to the Chairman – known as The Old Man (Daniel O’Herlihy), by-passing Dick Jones, who is none too pleased about that. Pretty sure everyone knows the story of how Sgt Murphy (Peter Weller) was horribly killed, converted into a programmed cyborg, and then regained his humanity whilst chasing down the bad guys. Edward Neumeier the writer, wanted to satirise the business culture of the 80’s, noting the aggressive American response to Japanese influences, and that a 17th century Japanese book – The Book of Five Rings- on effective killing was a big hit in Wall Street. The idea of Robocop came to him while he was learning film techniques on the set of Blade Runner, and his inspiration from mature comic books gave the story it’s platform.

The ED-209 made me laugh, especially when it fell over and squealed like a girl. Obviously a stop-motion model when it moved, it was the tech they had back then, and model makers are still making scale models of it in Model shows today, so it’s well loved. Weller got the part over other actors considered (Arnie and Rutger, Tom Berenger) as he was a smaller chap, had martial art skills and actually wanted the part to work with Verhoeven. He was the best choice in the end. The gory violence is so over the top it becomes funny, as it was intended to be by Neumeier and Verhoeven, but we never lose sight of the journey Murphy-Robocop-Murphy is on, and the scene where he visits the home he used to share with his wife and son, who have left, and remembers happy times, is so poignant.

Phil Rating:- a classic movie, an original story, there was nothing like it at the time. Great special effects and an exceptional robot in ED209. Top notch!

Fraggle Rating:- It was nearly as much fun watching Phil watch this than seeing it myself.


Backdraft 1991

Directed by Ron Howard, Backdraft tells the story of a Chicago fire department who are putting out the fires of a serial arsonist and focuses on two brothers, Lieutenant Stephen “Bull” McCaffrey (Kurt Russell) and Probationary Firefighter Brian McCaffrey (William Baldwin) and also Inspector Donald “Shadow” Rimgale, (Robert DeNiro) who is an arson investigator trying to track down the arsonist. The brothers are estranged, and there’s a fair bit of sibling rivallry going on, with both wanting to honour their Dad Captain Dennis McCaffrey (also Kurt, briefly) who died in a fire when they were little boys. Bull is separated from his wife Helen (Rebecca de Mornay) and Brian is picking up again with an ex girlfriend Jennifer Vaitkus, (Jennifer Jason Leigh) who also works for Alderman Marty Swayzak, (J.T.Walsh) who has supported fire department budget cuts for nefarious purposes. Scott Glenn plays the part of Senior Firefighter John “Axe” Adcox, who worked with the brother’s Dad, and is like an uncle to the brothers. Donald Sutherland has a small but effective part as Ronald Bartel, an imprisoned arsonist who set the fire that killed Dad McCaffrey. That’s it for spoilers just in case anyone hasn’t seen it!

Fraggle Rating:- I loved this movie back in the day, I have a thing for fires and explosions and this was full of them. The sound they give to the flames is amazing. The main actors went to Chicago’s fire training school to learn firefighting for real so they did look the part, but fire fighting professionals did note that how the fires depicted in the movie are not true to life as mostly you can’t see for smoke. But that’s fine by me, who wants to sit through 1 & 1/2 hours of watching smoke? The story is just another take on needy social services being cut by government departments resulting in a more dangerous and less effective service which then engenders an over the top revenge response, so nothing new there, but kudos though as they didn’t give it a Hollywood Happy Ending. The fires were brilliantly done, amazing! Did I say that already? 😊


Robocop 2 1990

Pfft. πŸ₯΄


The Magnificent Seven. 1960

No need for plot I think, we’ll go straight to the rating!

1960! I saw this as a kid, and remember it so well! Which is bonkers as I have a really bad memory for movies, it’s why I can rewatch them and not realise I’ve already seen them. Regular readers will know I had to see this again after watching the (inferior) Magnificent Seven 2017 I did last time out. (review Here). It was a complete joy to see it again. All my ‘heart-throbs’ from back then in one place, Yul Bryner with that walk he did, Steve McQueen with those eyes, Charles Bronson with those lips, and James Coburn with that cool dude attitude. Sigh. Anyway, it’s held up well considering it’s 60 years old. Of course you couldn’t get away with any of it these days, ‘white saviours’, diminished lady rΓ΄les, and diversity issues such as a Mexican – Chico- played by the German Horst Bucholz, and a Mexican old man played by Russian Valadimir Sokoloff (great name) but back then they could and they did. Eli Wallach (another diversity issue) as the baddie bandido ripping off the fruits of the mexican villagers labours with his bunch of swarthy ne’er do wells. The script is hokey, the actors in lesser parts over doing it (as did ol’Horst), but seeing Bryner, McQueen, Coburn and Bronson doing their cool cowboy thing again, well, it was magnificent! 😊

30 thoughts on “Not the 365 – Movie round up

  1. Three top choices! I saw ‘Robocop’ at the cinema and loved the over the top style, often played for laughs. (I didn’t bother with the sequels)
    As someone who attended many real-life fires in London as an EMT, ‘Backdraft’ had bags of realism that resonated with me. (I once caught a baby dropped from a bedroom window too)
    (They were right about the smoke of course. I still feel I can almost smell the smoke from some of the bigger fires I went to. But it would have been a harder film to enjoy.)
    ‘Mag 7’ is an icon now. None of the hokey acting or mis-casting matters after so long, and it’s an enjoyable watch every time.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Funny… I remember seeing all these, but don’t remember much about them. Weird…
    Fraggle, I got a kick out of “It was nearly as much fun watching Phil watch this than seeing it myself.’ Then your mini-remark about Robocop 2 totally slayed me.
    I’ve been watching old SyFy from the 50s — not as much fun.
    Hugs on the wing.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Me and my brothers loved Robocop so much when kids, in those times television, some time I told my younger brother the words of Dick Jones to Morton in the men’s bathroom, which fits because I am the second brother of four. Also is fun to mention it has not political correct diversity as the gang of villains are from every race and creed possible xP Its remake instead feels already quite outdated and so afraid of risks. I think I watched, and liked, the movie about firefighters. I will check the Magnificent Seven. Thanks, fragglerocking,.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. That’d be a miss for Robocop 2, then. I’ll strike it off my list of must-see films immediately.

    The cast of the Magnificent Seven was fairly diverse, just not in a way that would be acceptable these days. It’s years since I’ve seen it and I probably thought that the music was the most magnificent part.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Nice choice. Especially Robocop (the first one, not the other), which is a masterpiece, pure christic and sadistic Verhoeven. It’s funny you switched Peter and Paul Weller in your review (you could have add Mary, it would pleased Verhoeven), it made me laugh. That’s entertainment, the both could say. 🀣

    Liked by 2 people

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