Day 118

After a few weekends when one or both of us were unavailable, Sophie and I got together today and went to explore Embleton Bay and round about there.

Day 118 ~ Embleton Bay

It was a lovely day and so nice to be outside all day. There’ll be a full report at some point on the Universe blog.

Thursday Thoughts.

I knew I should have just done the crossword and the word scrambler in the newspaper this morning, but I went and spoilt it all by reading the news as well, and as always ended up being incensed.  Apparently in order to make our way in the world after bloody Brexit, we will be increasing our arms exports internationally.  The Defence & security Equipment International (DSEI) event is happening in London and our Defence secretary, Sir Michael Fallon was there doing a talk.  We’ve already secured £5.9 billion in defence (I use that word because he did)  orders in 2016 and are already the world’s second largest weapons exporter. Well, isn’t that something to be proud of.  By 2018 our ‘defence’ budget will be £37 billion.  (But we can’t afford pay rises for our public servants, or pay for mental health care). Our new weapons include Dreadnought subs, Apache helicopters, F35’s and frigates.  We’re also working to develop artificial intelligence for use in warfare. At least that’s good because real intelligence seems hard to come by.  Sir Fallon also told everyone “there are robust safety measures to allow ethical defence exports to flourish, protected by a licensing system to  ensure exports are rational and lawful and which guarantees that we do not in the process violate international law, create tensions, promote terrorism or endanger global security”. That should cheer up the civilians being bombed in Yemen with British weaponry supplied to the Saudi’s. The Rohingya muslims currently undergoing ethnic cleansing at the hands of the Burmese military in a training programme by the UK will also breathe a sigh of relief I’m sure.  Coincidentally the DSEI is on at the same time as International arms control talks are going on in Geneva, the hypocrisy is staggering.

My country does not look after people, not our own and certainly not anyone else’s.  Our considerable research and resources do not go into making the world a better place for anyone anywhere, but we are extremely good at defending ourselves, and  subjugating and killing other people, and it was ever thus.

So I took my camera out to the coast at South Shields, my go to place when the world gets me down, and I took Frego with me for company.  It was really windy with dramatic skies, but peaceful all the same.

We saw some police horses being excercised

and more weaponry! A Disappearing Gun on Trow Point was first placed there in 1887 when the army were experimenting with coastal defences. The gun was forced down into a pit for re-loading by the recoil after the gun fired, so affording protection to the crew and obscuring the gun from direct enemy fire. The structure was sunk deeply into the ground to accommodate the water upon which the platform rose and fell, actuated by air pressure pumps. Trials of platform took place on 15th and 16th December 1887. It was found that the raising and lowering of the platform was too slow and the system was abandoned in favour of the quicker and cheaper Elswick hydro-pneumatic mounting. The replica gun was installed in 1997.  The graffiti not long after!

this chap was having fun

I love the colour of waves just before they curl over

and how they hug the rocks

there are still little pops of colour to be found in the grass dunes

and places to sit and take in the view

Equilibrium restored!

 

 

 

 

 

Friday Film Shot

A couple of weeks ago I took the Rollei off to Little Haven beach to see if I could overcome the loading problems I’d had with the camera in my previous outing. Luckily all seems well now and I got 10 out of 12 decent shots, so up to 83% postable shots! 🙂

Due to the weather I haven’t been out with it since, so will split this into a 2 parter.

It was a lovely sunny late afternoon when I got there, nice blue sky, and I took a few detail shots on the way to the beach

Herd Groyne is always photogenic especially contrasted against the blue sky

Lots of seaweed covered rocks at this end of the beach

the sun was going down as I walked back from the beach to see the Weebles, I’ll post those next time,

Friday Film Shot

Today I had the pleasure of Livvys’ company, as it’s half term and her Mum and Dad were both working.  It was a lovely sunny morning so we went to Sandhaven beach to look for sea glass, then we met up with Shelley and her kids Cal & Liddy at the Wacky Warehouse, and had lunch at The Storybook.  Afterwards Livvy and I did shopping in ASDA, went through a carwash and then came home.  It was fun.  Took a few shots with the fuji but also with the SX-70, unfortunately I cocked up inserting the film so the shots have come out with ink leaks on them, so just 2 in colour. I took a couple with the 600 as well which is far less temperamental. All in all a fun day out.

liv-2

liv

liv-1

 

Monday Mobile Moments

All change then, the 365 is no more, but I am just about recovered now from the flu, and need to get back to some photographic goals.

Monday is always my first day back to work after a weekend, and am usually quite busy.  Today I had clients to see in South Shields and found that between clients I had 10 minutes to spare, so as I was driving down the coast road, I pulled off into one of the carparks, walked over the road and sat on a sand dune, to watch the sea for 5 minutes.  The tide was high but docile, the air was crisp and cool, and the dog walkers not yet arrived, so I sat and listened to the gentle swoosh of the waves on the beach, and took a few moments to appreciate the beauty of my surroundings, to feel lucky to live near to the sea, and to enjoy a little peace.

1000 miles day 3

Lesson of the day today~ The North Wind is not your friend. It wasn’t the wisest decision to pick the coastal route, The Lees as it’s called, along the sea front at South Shields today. I wanted to do a longer walk today as I’ll be working tomorrow, and this route seemed like a good plan, but hadn’t factored in how bloody windy it would be in such an exposed area, and as the walk went on, the wind got worse. I walked from The car park at The Waters Edge pub, all the way to Souter Lighthouse, and then back again. It wasn’t too bad on the way out, but coming back was a right struggle as the gusts of wind were head on. After 1/2hr of it I’d had enough and my brain was muttering ‘beam me up Scotty’ to itself, and at this point a really annoying man RAN I tell you! RAN past me, and I could see him dwindling into the distance, forging ahead until he was a tiny speck, and I’d only struggled on 20 more steps. How can anyone do that in those conditions??? The last thing you need to see is bloody Superman when you’re having a hard time just walking! How I hated him for his speed and fitness :). Nothing to do for it except put one foot in front of the other until finally I got back to the car, whereupon I wept and hugged the steering wheel.

Anyway, onwards ever onwards, I’ll have an easy day tomorrow!

Here are some photo’s I took along the way, all processed with RNI film app using Agfa Optima 200 Warm, apart from the B&W which was done in Filmborn, and all clickthroughable for embigguned versions.

The start,

it’s actually 2.75 miles so they lulled me into an extra 1/2 mile round trip!

On the way to Target rock

Next stop Frenchman’s Bay and this is the info bit

the bay

Manhaven Bay

unnamed bay

Marsden Bay

Marsden Rock

Pompey’s Pillar (no idea why it’s called that)

Taking it in

Last bit, crossing over to pass Marsden Bay

The Limekilns
built in the 1870’s to take advantage of a bleak but perfect location. Limestone had been quarried at Marsden for hundreds of years being used in many notable buildings in the area including Whitburn Windmill in 1796, so with a constant supply of limestone and the nearby Whitburn Colliery providing coal for fuel, these large ovens couldn’t fail to be profitable, it was geographically perfect.
Layers of limestone and coal were poured into the top of the ovens heating and breaking down the stone to produce quicklime which was used in agriculture to neutralise soil. It was also an important element of the steel and chemical industry and was used to make cement and concrete.

All along The Lees are memorial benches, bought by relatives of beloved deceased, and this one was particularly poignant, only 14yrs old 😦

And that’s it for today!
What I don’t get about this walking malarkey is that once you get home and sit down with a nice cuppa tea and a snuggle with the cat, when you go to stand up again you can barely walk across the room without creaking and groaning. Is it supposed to hurt this much???

5.54 miles

FIlmborn~at Little Haven beach

Still with black & white but this time using the Ilford delta 3200 setting.

Can’t visit Little Haven beach without visiting The Weebles

Herd Groyne Lighthouse and in the background over the river on the right is Tynemouth Priory and a statue of Lord Collingwood

a closer view

Having a paddle

and away