1000 miles day 3

Lesson of the day today~ The North Wind is not your friend. It wasn’t the wisest decision to pick the coastal route, The Lees as it’s called, along the sea front at South Shields today. I wanted to do a longer walk today as I’ll be working tomorrow, and this route seemed like a good plan, but hadn’t factored in how bloody windy it would be in such an exposed area, and as the walk went on, the wind got worse. I walked from The car park at The Waters Edge pub, all the way to Souter Lighthouse, and then back again. It wasn’t too bad on the way out, but coming back was a right struggle as the gusts of wind were head on. After 1/2hr of it I’d had enough and my brain was muttering ‘beam me up Scotty’ to itself, and at this point a really annoying man RAN I tell you! RAN past me, and I could see him dwindling into the distance, forging ahead until he was a tiny speck, and I’d only struggled on 20 more steps. How can anyone do that in those conditions??? The last thing you need to see is bloody Superman when you’re having a hard time just walking! How I hated him for his speed and fitness :). Nothing to do for it except put one foot in front of the other until finally I got back to the car, whereupon I wept and hugged the steering wheel.

Anyway, onwards ever onwards, I’ll have an easy day tomorrow!

Here are some photo’s I took along the way, all processed with RNI film app using Agfa Optima 200 Warm, apart from the B&W which was done in Filmborn, and all clickthroughable for embigguned versions.

The start,

it’s actually 2.75 miles so they lulled me into an extra 1/2 mile round trip!

On the way to Target rock

Next stop Frenchman’s Bay and this is the info bit

the bay

Manhaven Bay

unnamed bay

Marsden Bay

Marsden Rock

Pompey’s Pillar (no idea why it’s called that)

Taking it in

Last bit, crossing over to pass Marsden Bay

The Limekilns
built in the 1870’s to take advantage of a bleak but perfect location. Limestone had been quarried at Marsden for hundreds of years being used in many notable buildings in the area including Whitburn Windmill in 1796, so with a constant supply of limestone and the nearby Whitburn Colliery providing coal for fuel, these large ovens couldn’t fail to be profitable, it was geographically perfect.
Layers of limestone and coal were poured into the top of the ovens heating and breaking down the stone to produce quicklime which was used in agriculture to neutralise soil. It was also an important element of the steel and chemical industry and was used to make cement and concrete.

All along The Lees are memorial benches, bought by relatives of beloved deceased, and this one was particularly poignant, only 14yrs old 😦

And that’s it for today!
What I don’t get about this walking malarkey is that once you get home and sit down with a nice cuppa tea and a snuggle with the cat, when you go to stand up again you can barely walk across the room without creaking and groaning. Is it supposed to hurt this much???

5.54 miles